Are You a Twit?

If you spend much time on the Internet, you’re familiar with twitter, even if you don’t entirely understand the appeal. Although it was started only four years ago, it’s now one of the most visited sites on the net. In fact, social media sites (Facebook, Twitter, etc) are now passing search engines as the most highly-trafficed sites on the Internet.  So what’s the big deal?

Twitter has a simple premise: what can you say in 140 characters or less? You could use it to waste time telling all your friends what you’re doing every minute of every day, but if you’re reading this, you’re probably more interested in how you can use it as a practical tool. So can you?

 

Twitter is the best-known example of what’s called microblogging; very space-restricted blogs. Like every other service ever made available on the Internet, people have used it for spamming links, and like most blogging software, it now uses nofollow links. In other words: linking to your websites on twitter won’t do anything for your search rankings. What it can do is help you bring in new customers and new business from your old customers.

For example, we often use our twitter page to let people know about new services we offer and articles that they might be interested in. At the time of this writing, the feed isn’t optimized yet; all it does is repeat the links from our Facebook page; thanks to Facebook’s linking feature, all you need to do is post a link and it’ll pull in the first paragraph of the linked page. Since we use descriptive permalinks, it’s easy to tell what the link is about even without other information..but isn’t there a better way?

By using a link-shortening service, we can add a description and still keep the total number of characters low enough to allow easy retweeting; retweeting is the process of forwarding on the message. For example, if we tweet “Awesome SEO article at xyz.com”, one of our followers might then tweet “RT: Awesome SEO article at xyz.com”, and maybe we get more visitors to this website.

There are several URL shortening services available, the most popular of which are probably bit.ly and tinyurl; twitter is also moving to wrap all links using their own t.co service. The downside of using these is that you can’t tell where the link is going without clicking on it; the upside is that it saves an awful lot of space!

So after optimization, we might announce the post on why pagerank doesn’t matter with something like this: “Why Pagerank Doesn’t Matter: http://bit.ly/cDbf56″. Short and to the point. And isn’t that what twitter is all about?