Cross-Browser Compatibility

One thing that causes a lot of headaches for web developers is getting sites to look good in every browser.

Notice that I did not say, getting a site to look the same in every browser. While it’s possible to get a site to look more or less the same, there are always going to be minor differences and it’s generally more trouble than it’s worth. As long as the site looks good and has consistent branding, there’s no reason that it needs to look identical on every computer.

Once you realize that, web design becomes much less of a hassle. One method is to build out a basic site that will work in every browser, then add flourishes that will improve the viewing experience for people with modern browsers, without taking anything away from those who are still using older browsers.

HTML5 and CSS3 offer some great examples.  Suppose you want to have some really nice-looking buttons. You can put in rounded corners and add a background gradient to make the buttons stand out.  Visitors running Internet Explorer won’t be able to see this, and will just get the regular old buttons, so to them it’s the same as if you didn’t make any changes at all, but other visitors get an enhanced browsing experience.

Or consider HTML forms. The new input types in HTML5 degrade gracefully; any browser that doesn’t know how to handle them simply treats them as text inputs instead. As a result, older browsers get the same experience they always have, but more modern browsers get a better presentation.

In short: design your sites to look good on every major browser. Then, if you like, use modern tools such as HTML5 and CSS3 so that, on modern browsers, the sites look even better.