Keyword Stuffing

Earlier today, I was working on an article for another site and needed some anecdotal statistics, which I obtained by taking a look at the computer services section on craigslist.  I noticed that a lot of the website designers and so-called SEO experts advertising there are still trying to get away with keyword stuffing.

Keyword stuffing is a spam method that was employed in the 90s and the first half of the past decade; unethical web designers would fill their keyword meta tags with a huge number of unrelated keywords in an attempt to get their page to show up at the top of the search results; this is why many search engines no longer use that tag. Another common technique was to simply put a big list of keywords at the bottom of the page, possibly using cloaking techniques to make them visible to search engines but not to the users.

One thing many people are not aware of is that Google actually does employ human beings to check websites that are flagged by its software and see whether they’re legitimate or spam; as you can imaging, sites that are marked as spam don’t have much luck getting Google traffic after that! Keyword stuffing is one of the main things that these people are instructed to look for.

So noticing that a number of the craigslist posts had keyword stuffing in them, I checked out the webpages they were linking to and found the same thing: keyword stuffing in the meta keyword tag, in the body of the page, or both. Shouldn’t a “professional web designer” know better than to use SEO techniques that Google has been penalizing for half a decade?

Now, don’t take this to mean that you shouldn’t use relevant terms on your own site! This post contains a number of terms that we’d probably like to rank for – professional web designer, SEO, etc. But notice that they’re not in a list at the bottom of the post and they’re not repeated over and over; rather, they’re being used naturally. If a Google engineer was to come check out this page, it would get an easy “not spam” classification, because everything on it is legitimately there for the purpose of providing useful information to the reader. We also use tags on many posts; if you look down a bit, you’ll see that this post is tagged with several terms to help Google (and our on-site search) tell what this page is about. The difference is largely in scale, as well as intent: we’ve added a small number of terms relevant to this page, rather than pulling out the thesaurus and emptying it out!