Website Usability, Part V: Don’t Annoy the User

It seems obvious, but many sites seem to have a problem with it: if you want your users to keep coming back, don’t annoy them! Here are a few common-sense things to avoid.

  • No unsolicited windows. If you use pop-ups on your site, half your users will be using a modern browser that blocks them, and you’ll annoy the rest. Find a better way to get attention.
  • Arrange the website logically. Don’t make the user think about how to find something; it should be obvious.
  • Provide a search; we mentioned this before, but it bears repeating. Today’s users don’t want to click around looking for things; they want to jump straight to their target.
  • Be consistent. Again, this is something we mentioned before. If your navigation bar is on the left on your homepage, it should be on the left on every other page as well. A user attempting to search should know exactly where the search box is without having to, well, search for it!
  • Don’t make the user do work that the computer can do; one particularly annoying example is when the same information must be input in several places.
  • Avoid making the user remember things. If two or more items must be compared, place them side by side.
  • Design efficient pages. Even if you expect most users to be on broadband, remember that large images still take time to load, and a bored user is a lost user!
  • Don’t make users lose their work! If a page must time out, warn the user and give him a chance to extend the timer or save his work.
  • Design webpages so that they can be printed; long, complex documents in particular are often printed for later reading. If needed, the page can use different style sheets for viewing and printing.
  • When users must wait for something to complete, give them a way to track progress; for particularly long tasks, such as large downloads, provide an estimate of how long the task will take.